Zanopan

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sexpigeon:


Path puts a silly amount of trust in its avatars, especially given their tiny size. I never know who the shoes are.
Path is more tappy than typey. That’s fine, I suppose. It certainly makes for a clean flow.
Path is tappy and its content reads like the content of taps. “I am in a place,” you tap. “:)”, come the replies.
Path is pretty in the same designy way as our modern museums. They are shaped like battleships and grain silos and crumpled souffles. There is much said about flow and fatigue and how one of these has been optimized and the other one reduced.
These museums are very exciting when they open. You show up and marvel along with all of the other fans of architecture. Maybe you return for one of those nights where they stay open late and there is a band and drinking. “A great space,” you think. Maybe one day you’ll be rich and rent out the atrium for a private party.
The art doesn’t get talked about so much at these museums. The museum itself is the “social object,” as it were.
Eventually the particulars around which the museum was designed fall out of fashion. A fresh crop of architects finds it to be too flashy, or too dull, or to have been guided by faulty principles. There is congestion where there should be flow. Certain rooms are simply exhausting. Maybe it is even an eyesore.
This is good for the museum. Now they can really fuck up the place. Fill a room with a thousand cubic feet of lead. Let Matthew Barney dangle from a rope and scribble some shit high on a wall where no one can see it. Or: just let their rooms be dull rooms filled with rousing art.
Path is a monument to Path. It is no place to scribble in. I wish it longevity so that it might find shabbiness.

sexpigeon:

Path puts a silly amount of trust in its avatars, especially given their tiny size. I never know who the shoes are.

Path is more tappy than typey. That’s fine, I suppose. It certainly makes for a clean flow.

Path is tappy and its content reads like the content of taps. “I am in a place,” you tap. “:)”, come the replies.

Path is pretty in the same designy way as our modern museums. They are shaped like battleships and grain silos and crumpled souffles. There is much said about flow and fatigue and how one of these has been optimized and the other one reduced.

These museums are very exciting when they open. You show up and marvel along with all of the other fans of architecture. Maybe you return for one of those nights where they stay open late and there is a band and drinking. “A great space,” you think. Maybe one day you’ll be rich and rent out the atrium for a private party.

The art doesn’t get talked about so much at these museums. The museum itself is the “social object,” as it were.

Eventually the particulars around which the museum was designed fall out of fashion. A fresh crop of architects finds it to be too flashy, or too dull, or to have been guided by faulty principles. There is congestion where there should be flow. Certain rooms are simply exhausting. Maybe it is even an eyesore.

This is good for the museum. Now they can really fuck up the place. Fill a room with a thousand cubic feet of lead. Let Matthew Barney dangle from a rope and scribble some shit high on a wall where no one can see it. Or: just let their rooms be dull rooms filled with rousing art.

Path is a monument to Path. It is no place to scribble in. I wish it longevity so that it might find shabbiness.

Noramoji

Fonts are created from storefront signs, made available for download, and put onto shirts for sale (where some of the profits go back to the store owners).

If an oil puddle is found on the factory floor, most companies would quickly get someone to clean it up before it causes an accident. At Toyota, they would quickly get someone to place warning cones and tape around the puddle, and then they would figure out where the puddle came from. Was a leaky forklift parked here? Does one of the pipes overhead have a leak? Is a nearby robot flinging a few drops of oil from it’s joints every minute? The oil puddle is a sign of a problem somewhere else, possibly a more important one, and you don’t clean it up until you’ve figured out where it came from and fixed the cause.

—ceribus peribus, writing about his father’s experience working for Toyota. (via stevewyshywaniuk)

(Source: metafilter.com, via pieratt)

p-dpa:

Jurassic Park Expanded Book, Voyager Company (1991)

The novel Jurassic Park by Michael Crichton, an ebook on a 1,4 MB floppy disc, introduced in 1992!

This was the first title in the Expanded Books series produced by the famous Voyager Company, these ebooks were designed for the brand new Apple Powerbook computers. […] 

Note that they called it Expanded books, their pitch was that it offered extended functionality compared to printed books. “Electronic text is a dynamic medium that enables you to become a more active reader”

—Henrik Ahlen

(Source: alfabravo.com, via redactron)

battlemaxace:

from The Art of Computer Designing by Osamu Satu, who worked on LSD: Dream Emulator and Eastern Mind: The Lost Souls of Tong-Nou.

i think this was brought to my attention by othellomi? thank you! it seems to still be on mediafire here.

(Source: mollygons)

The Business Card Raytracer

The goal was to produce the source code for a raytracer…that would fit on the back of a business card.

Andrew Kensler’s version is mesmerizing and one of the greatest hack that I have seen. Since I am curious, I decided to deconstruct it: Here is what I understood.

(Source: metafilter.com)

tysonkallberg:

Parallax Lockscreen Concept for iOS 7

I’m going to go on record saying that iOS7’s parallax effects, while quite cute, are a lot form and not a lot function. That said, I am pretty interested in the ‘dynamic wallpapers’ for the lock screen. Alright, so maybe it’s all eerily similar to Android of yore, but I don’t care.

Right now there are a couple of ‘bubble’ wallpapers; you’ll get a subtle parallax effect on a photo background, and a nifty scrolling effect on a panoramic photo.

This got me thinking about all the things you could do with a few layers of images and some simple parallax.

I whipped up a quick template in Quartz Composer to test parallax. It should actually work fairly well to test parallax effects for apps as well. You can download it here if you feel so inclined. It’s worth noting this isn’t using ‘real’ parallax it’s exploiting actual 3d transforms, it’s enough for the sake of playing with the effect.

Anyways, I fooled around with some quick sketches, you can check out my results in the video. The first example is of the basic parallax effect you’d get today on a photo. The 3 that follow are made up of 4-6 image layers.

(If the video is being funny in the post, it’s here as well)

I’m going to run off and explore what could be done with some infographics. I’m thinking calendar, reminder or weather info could be displayed in a really neat way using this effect.

Ideas - week of February 24th to March 3rd

[To ward off stuffed-up corporate pompous talk, I’ll post the rough notes of what I’ve been thinking about each week.]

- Making an app that lets users find each other in order to have a stranger for brunch.

- An art show dedicated to blandness and things transmuted to mundanity: a table of grey gravel, the entire MobileMe archives crunched into raw bytes and then displayed as greyscale pixels, show posters on printed in clear varnish on grey paper.

- A musical version of the Piet programming language.

- A social network with a pre-determined closure date, and if that would hinder or help expression.

- What metric Facebook is using to determine if ads are pushing away users, and what sort of warning displays they have in their office if it goes over the line.